Resume Tips for the Oil and Gas Industry

Posted in Fracking Jobs

Resume Tips for the Oil and Gas Industry

Resume Tips for Candidates Applying for Jobs in the Oil and Gas Industry Your resume is a reflection of your professional self. The secret to a great CV is being able to convey your strengths and skills to your potential employer without boring them with useless information. Here are some guidelines for you if you’re hoping to land a job in the oil and gas industry. The basics: format Should you use chronological format or a functional one for your resume? A chronological format is detailing your work experience coherently, while a functional one is highlighting only the work experience applicable to the company you’re trying to get into. The chronological format is more preferred for managerial positions in the oil and gas sector since it can clearly detail to employers how the applicant has gotten to where he or she is now. Functional, on the other hand, is very useful for people who have had gaps in their work experience or are looking to transition into a new career. In other words, applicants who already have a track record in the industry should use a chronological format, while skilled workers who aren’t already employees of oil and gas firms (i.e. clerical or maintenance workers) should utilize the functional format. Provide the information the company is asking for Since you’re applying for jobs that are specific to the oil and gas industry, it’s not necessary to highlight irrelevant skillsets. On the first page of your resume, you should clearly identify your attributes and skills, and provide examples that prove your experience. For example, if you’re applying for a project management position, you should state in your resume your working experience in the oil and gas field. Describe the projects that you’ve been involved with and activities that you’ve performed in order to help your previous company move forward. If you’re applying for a skilled worker position, do your research and find out where a particular company needs help the most. For example: Unaoil, which is servicing a big oil and gas company in West Qurna, is probably looking for individuals who can do field work in Iraq. To increase your chances of getting hired by the company, write on your resume that you’re willing to relocate abroad, particularly in Iraq, for work. Keywords Oil and gas companies probably receive thousands of resumes everyday given the industry’s scope of responsibilities. Because of this, some companies use the help of computer programs to scan for keywords about skills that they’re looking for in an individual. It’s a great idea to use multiple, synonymous words that reflect your skills to increase your chances of getting discovered from the rest. Don’t forget to review! Grammatical errors can most often put off employers, especially if you’re applying for an executive position. Don’t be ashamed to seek the help of a writer friend in order...

Read More »

The Ultimate Guide to Work Boots

Posted in Fracking Jobs

Whether you haul frac sand or crude, perform roustabout duties, or trudge between a sample source and your mudlogging office, you need work boots to get your oilfield work completed safely and comfortably. The Fracking Jobs team created this Ultimate Guide to Work Boots to help you select the right pair of hard-working footwear for hard-working oilfield folks – like yourself. Why publish an “Ultimate Guide to Work Boots”? Is such a guide really necessary? You bet it is. In all types of weather, but especially during the fall and winter seasons, you’ll be working outdoors in rugged oilfield environments. Whether your work takes you to Montana, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, or even Texas – which has its own brand of cold weather – you need high-quality footwear. Your toes are some of your most vulnerable extremities, and some of the most challenging body parts to keep warm. The work boots you buy will be very important investments. Top-notch work boots aren’t cheap, and many different brands and combinations of features are available. So take some time to figure out exactly what kinds of boots will suit your needs. Don’t leave your selection of footwear to chance, and expect to spend a little to get comfortable boots that will keep your feet warm and safe. Below, we break down the most significant components of work boots. We explain what you should look for with each component, and help you decide which features you’ll need and which you can skip. Click on any tab on the left column to learn more about a particular component… Uppers / Outer Materials Soles / Traction Insulation Water Resistance Electrical Hazard Protection Safety Toe / Steel Toe Metatarsal Boots Comfort / Fit OSHA Standards Cost Just about every quality pair of work boots is constructed with “uppers” (the part of the boot above the sole) that are leather. Some portions of the uppers might also consist of man-made materials as well. Leather is the ideal material for work boots because it “breathes”, or allows for some circulation of fresh air around your feet. The pores in leather allow for air to flow in and out of your boots. Leather also can “wick” water moisture and perspiration away from your feet, allowing your feet to stay dry. And, of course, leather is an extremely strong material which can’t be easily torn or punctured. Most of us can remember our father’s or grandfather’s old leather work boots which lasted for years and years. As mentioned, at times man-made materials are used in the construction of work boots. These materials, usually urethane or vinyl, aren’t as good as leather is for allowing breathability, and they don’t “break in” around your feet like leather does. However, some man-made materials are necessary for certain portions of the boot. Most manufacturers ship leather care instructions with each new pair of...

Read More »

Oil Drilling Videos for Newbies

Posted in Fracking Jobs

If you’re new to the oil and gas industry, you need to learn as much as you can about the tools of the trade, the lingo, and the environments that you want to work in. One of the best ways to familiarize yourself with the oil business is to check out some of the videos we have listed on this page. We sifted through the hundreds of videos that are available on YouTube (and elsewhere) to find those that offer real, beneficial knowledge on drilling and safety. This isn’t easy, considering the many videos out there that have either been produced by the anti-fracking industry or by those who are bitter about their jobs or life situations. Having said that, there are plenty of informative, quality videos available online that are on par with the ones on this page. Anyway, below are a few videos that we feel are some of the best oil drilling videos for newbies currently available… Take a Drilling Rig Tour – The North American Drilling Corporation posted this excellent video which gives a pretty thorough overview of a working drill rig as well as some of the tools and terminologies used around a rig. If you know nothing about the fracking world, then this video is a “must see”. There are some good descriptions here of the different types of activities that take place, and the video production is pretty high quality. You’ll be able to tag along with the narrator around the rig as though you’re right there, and “newbies” will be able to follow along without getting confused. This video was shot at a drill rig in Texas. The North American Drilling Corporation is featured in the FJ Company Directory, which you can access free of charge. Intro to Fracking and Horizontal Drilling – The Marathon Oil Company produced this video, which gives a good introduction to hydraulic fracturing as well as horizontal drilling. The video explains how a drilling operation is started, what fracking is and how it is accomplished, takes a look at horizontal drilling, and discusses what happens to a well after it has ended production. Very clear animations and explanations will educate anyone interested in learning how fracking takes place – without the needless politics and controversy. One of the more “straight to the point” videos explaining fracking. The Horizontal Drilling Process – A more detailed explanation of horizontal drilling is offered via this video from one of the largest players in the fracking industry, Chesapeake Energy*. This high-quality video also uses animations to explain in detail how the horizontal drilling process works. Chesapeake gives a solid presentation on the many safeguards used during the drilling process (which, unfortunately, are generally unacknowledged by those in the anti-fracking community). The animations show the seven layers of protections separating the drilled hole from the surrounding underground formation where the drilling...

Read More »

Entry Level Oil Rig Jobs via ShaleNET

Posted in Fracking Jobs

Entry Level Oil Rig Jobs via ShaleNET

Many folks are drawn to looking into employment with the oil and gas industry thanks to advances in fracking, which is creating tens of thousands of new jobs. However, unless you have a CDL, getting your foot in the door of the shale oil and gas industry is difficult, though not impossible. The very fact that the oil and gas industry is growing so quickly within the U.S. (as well as around the world) means that even those without oilfield experience can find ways to get hired into the industry. In fact, along with the current boom in fracking related drilling, there is another huge trend that is opening the door for those who lack oilfield experience. Right now, millions of baby boomers are now retiring from their lucrative careers within the oil and gas industry. The mass retirement of boomers is a trend that is affecting all industries, to be sure, but this trend affects the oil shale business more significantly because it is occurring just as fracking begins to take off. So how can someone who is completely new to the oil and gas industry get into the business? We at Fracking Jobs have posted numerous articles on getting oilfield jobs by first getting a commercial driver license. But what if you aren’t interested in getting a CDL or simply want to work directly on an oil rig? Well, one of the most commonly offered entry level oil rig jobs is that of “roustabout”. A roustabout is the “gopher” or “mule” of the oil rig team; the person saddled with the everyday grunt work of the drilling rig. Newbies to the oilfield industry are often hired as roustabouts as the job doesn’t require extensive oil rig experience. However, some introductory training is still necessary for those seeking work as roustabouts. This training is available via private oil and gas training schools, vocational schools, and sometimes directly through an employer. Remember also that working as a roustabout is one way into oilfield work, and can lead to higher paying oil rig jobs as experience accumulates. Ok – so you’re interested in seeking entry level oil rig work, and it looks like pursuing a job as a roustabout is the way to go. But you don’t have the funds available for private school training, you don’t live near a vocational school that offers oilfield training, and you’ve been told that the companies that are drilling in the areas where you seek employment won’t offer training to new hires. What to do? One solution is the private/public partnership which started in Pennsylvania known as “ShaleNET”. ShaleNET is a program where private oilfield employers have recognized the need to offer skills training for new employees. This recognition is taking place since employers realize that there is a huge and growing shortage of adequately trained oilfield personnel. For now, ShaleNET focuses on...

Read More »

Hydrogen Sulfide Safety

Posted in Fracking Jobs

One of the by-products of oil and gas drilling is a toxic gas known as hydrogen sulfide. Also known by its slang names “swamp gas”, “sour gas”, or “rotten egg gas”, hydrogen sulfide (or H2S) is a potentially deadly substance that anyone working around drilling rigs needs to be aware of. Your employer should provide you with safety training that includes dealing with the dangers of H2S. However, especially if you are new to the oil and gas industry, you need to familiarize yourself with hydrogen sulfide, the hazards that it can present, and how to avoid its dangerous effects. Hydrogen sulfide has some notable characteristics: Heavier than air – Because H2S gas is heavier than air, it tends to collect near the bottom of any space where it has a significant presence. That space can be a tank or other type of container. Chemical composition – A hydrogen sulfide molecule consists of two hydrogen atoms bonded to a single sulfur atom. This makes its molecular composition similar to that of water (H2O) which, of course, is two hydrogen atoms bonded to a single oxygen atom. This chemical composition means that H2S is a commonly found gas, so don’t assume you won’t encounter it. Flammable / explosive – H2S has a “flashpoint” of 500 degrees, which means it can catch fire and burn at or above 500 degrees Fahrenheit. A lit cigarette, butane lighter, or camping lantern is all it takes to ignite a heavy concentration of H2S gas. In fact, H2S gas is three times more flammable than natural gas. It’s invisible – You can’t see hydrogen sulfide gas (like many other types of toxic gases), so your sense of sight will not work to help you determine whether it is present. Smells like “rotten eggs” as a result of the sulfur content – H2S produces a strong, somewhat offensive odor in lower concentrations which has led to the substance’s many nicknames. However, this odor tends to decrease when H2S is present in higher concentrations and it also can decrease the sensitivity of your sense of smell. These characteristics mean that you should never rely on your sense of smell to detect whether or not the gas is present in a given environment. Highly corrosive – Hydrogen sulfide is very corrosive to metals. It can quickly break down metal pipes, tanks, or other metal materials that it comes into contact with. This corrosive nature of H2S can cause pipes or tanks to develop leaks. One of the significant hazards in the oilfield – Not only is it common in oilfields, but hydrogen sulfide can act very quickly on an unsuspecting victim – rapidly causing significant injury or death. In addition, it is important to be aware of the effects of alcohol use around H2S gas. While alcohol is prohibited around any drilling environment, alcohol consumption within a 24-hour...

Read More »

Water Hauler Jobs Overview

Posted in Fracking Jobs

Water Hauler Jobs Overview

Along with oil and gas, a drilling operation produces large amounts of salt water and other waste fluid by-products which have to be removed and properly disposed of. Large vacuum equipped tanker trucks are used to transport the waste fluids away from drill sites to regulated and approved disposal sites. Such waste fluid transport and disposal requires “water haulers”, the folks who operate the tanker trucks used to haul away by-products. Water haulers differ from crude haulers in that they aren’t moving the actual product which makes the money for drilling companies, but they deal with less volatile (and therefore less dangerous) materials. Also, unlike their over-the-road trucking colleagues, water haulers are required to be somewhat physically active during the course of a workday. They are constantly getting in and out of a truck, walking around a well site, hooking up and unhooking hoses, checking gauges, and inspecting the progress of a tanker load or unload as it takes place. So, what are water hauler jobs like in the oilfields? Well, a reputable employer will offer in-depth training on all aspects of loading and unloading a tanker trailer, of course, before turning a new water hauler loose in the field. But a brief overview of the water hauler’s day is described below: After leaving the company yard, locate the tank site (your destination) – a water hauler should have a map which gives the locations for all of the wells that will be serviced. The employer may have even provided a GPS device (although a professional driver should own one anyway). Check the well location upon arrival – an experienced water hauler, arriving at a well site for the first time, will make sure to be in the right location by checking the signs leading into the well site at the site entrance. These signs will give location details including phone numbers to call in case of an emergency (an experienced driver will have these numbers in the cab, also). The gate will be locked, and the keys will be provided by the employer. Open the gate, drive on in to the well site – most well sites will provide ample room to maneuver a semi. However, sites are almost always in remote areas and the service roads are bare earth. This means the roads will be muddy, dusty, rocky, very bumpy, or a combination of all of these. No nice, smooth, well-paved and properly marked asphalt warehouse parking lots here! Line up near the proper tank – identify the water tank; make sure you aren’t connecting to any oil tanks! Park the rig in the spot which gives the most convenient (and safest) access to the water tank, then set the truck brakes. Retrieve paperwork, gauges, and safety equipment – some employers will require drivers to set out traffic cones around the work area before beginning any unloading...

Read More »