What Does a Mudlogger Do?

Posted in Fracking Jobs

What Does a Mudlogger Do?

Oil and gas exploration and extraction relies on highly trained and specialized personnel in all phases of the drilling process from the time a shale play is first discovered until the oil comes out of the ground. One of the many specialists working on a drilling rig is the “mudlogger”. Mudloggers monitor and record the drilling activity that occurs from the rig, reporting it in a “mudlog”. Usually, loggers work at the drill site in a small portable office – similar in size to an RV – retrieving drill samples, analyzing them, and recording the resulting data. Mudloggers are expected to evaluate lithology samples and hydrocarbon “shows”. They monitor rig activity and “downhole” conditions. Mudloggers are expected to possess good communication skills, as they have to forward the geological drill information that the drilling client requests. This brings up another aspect of the mudlogger’s world: loggers usually (though not always) work for “third-party” logging companies. So, while a larger company may be operating the drilling rig, the mudlogger may be working for a firm which acts as a contractor for that rig operator. This means that mudloggers, like many other drilling rig personnel, will be working for an extended period at an actual drilling site before moving on to the next site. Flexibility and availability for long-term drilling assignments is expected. Until a few years ago, it might have been possible to land a job as a mudlogger with a third-party logging firm without a college degree. But those days are long gone. Today, employers seek out college graduates who possess Bachelor of Science degrees in geology, petroleum engineering, geophysics, or some type of other related science degree. Those seeking a career as a mudlogger must be computer-savvy, of course. Expertise with the most common Windows-based business applications is required. The days of the hardscrabble, “school of hard knocks” oilfield hand-turned lithology expert are gone or fading fast (if such a character ever really existed to begin with.) The mudlogger isn’t all brains and no brawn, however: this being an oilfield environment, physical fitness and stamina must be part of the aspiring logger’s makeup. Like other rig hands, 12-hour, 16-hour, or even longer shifts aren’t out of the norm for mudloggers. And, like other rig employees, loggers are expected to be drug-free and have good driving records. Possessing a commercial driving license wouldn’t hurt a would-be mudlogger (just as having a CDL can help any potential oilfield job seeker.) Mud loggers are expected to keep tabs on the drilling rig operations on a 24/7 basis by providing detailed analysis of the geology, oil and gas productions, drilling and mud data, and any issues that are encountered during drilling. Detailed Mudlogger Responsibilities: Collect drilling samples from various depths during the ongoing drilling operations, and thoroughly evaluate these samples. Clean up and prepare samples before examination, and even photograph various samples...

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Get OSHA Certified and Improve Your Job Hunt

Posted in Fracking Jobs

Get OSHA Certified and Improve Your Job Hunt

If you’re seeking a fracking job but don’t have oilfield experience, then the next best thing you can do is gain some key tools and certifications which will make you more valuable in the eyes of oilfield employers. For example, getting a commercial driver’s license instantly makes you a far more desirable fracking job candidate than someone who does not have a CDL. In addition, oilfield companies are increasingly looking for job candidates who possess OSHA certification. Not only does making the effort to get OSHA certified make you more valuable to an employer, it is crucial to earn OSHA training for your own safety. In addition, OSHA training can be conducted online in the comfort of your own home. Here are some of the advantages you gain when you get OSHA 10 certified: One less expense for a potential employer interested in hiring you. You already have OSHA certification, so this saves a potential employer money and training time. Online OSHA training is relatively inexpensive. For little more than the average cost of a full tank of gas, you’re able to invest in yourself. This training will pay for itself after your first couple of hours on the job. Proves that you are committed to safety – extremely important in the fracking world – and that you’re also committed to pursuing a career in the oilfield business. You’re not just some “fly by night” employee that will be here today, then gone tomorrow once a company hires you. Most importantly, you’ll learn some of the most important ways to stay safe on the job, especially where working near or around an oil rig is concerned. Rigs can be hazardous, extremely busy, and unpredictable environments. Knowing proven ways to maintain safety will keep you (and your future co-workers) in one piece. OSHA safety training programs come in two “flavors”: Construction Industry and General Industry. While either OSHA certification will increase your value for potential employers, the Construction Industry training is better suited for the type of environment that drilling rigs offer, as well as the types of safety concerns most prevalent around rigs. OSHA states that “workers can attend 10-hour or 30-hour classes delivered by OSHA-authorized trainers.The 10-hour class is intended for entry level workers, while the 30-hour class is more appropriate for supervisors or workers with some safety responsibility.”¬†For purposes of those seeking entry-level work within the fracking industry, then, the 10-hour construction industry training program is...

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Oilfield Safety Introduction

Posted in Fracking Jobs

Before you set foot on a drilling rig, the most important training you’ll receive will involve safety training. If you’ve ever driven a truck, worked in a manufacturing environment, or on a farm or ranch, then you already know how important safety awareness is. Oilfields and rigs incorporate all of these environments, with additional circumstances added to the mix. You’ll be surrounded by hazardous materials, heavy equipment, and high voltage generators. Don’t be afraid of this type environment – instead, learn as much as you can about it. Safety training is the most important training you’ll receive prior to starting your oilfield career, and it’s never too soon to begin. Below is a an introductory video from Pioneer Energy Services – a leading company in oil and gas drilling – involving oilfield safety. There are some familiar and common sense points here (keep walkways clear, avoid high voltage equipment if you aren’t trained to operate it, lock out/tag out, etc.), but this video is a must-see for anyone seeking a fracking...

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Oilfield Pre-Employment Physical

Posted in Fracking Jobs

Oilfield Pre-Employment Physical

If you’re thinking of relocating to an oil patch town, or are presently living near one and you are considering going after an oilfield related job, chances are you’ll be required to undertake an oilfield pre-employment physical. If you’re overweight, have high blood pressure, or other serious medical conditions, the physically demanding work required of those who work in the oilfields may not be for you. Yes, there is money to be made in the fracking world, but – at least for many of the jobs that directly involve rig work – you should be in good physical condition. Below, ‘LVC’ puts together a very helpful video which gives detailed information on what to expect should you be required to take a pre-employment physical exam prior to beginning an oilfield job. While much of what is described here may sound familiar to those of us who have been through CDL pre-employment physicals, it’s fair to say that the tests outlined here go beyond standard DOT physical requirements. While this video isn’t professionally produced, this is a good thing: you’re getting a direct description about the tests involved from someone who’s been through them. Keep in mind that while this video was recorded in North Dakota, you can expect to undergo similar physical tests no matter where you decide to look for oilfield work. Thanks to ‘LVC’ for recording this video and giving a very good overview on what to...

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Oil Shale Drilling: A Balanced View

Posted in Fracking Jobs

A sensible view of oil shale drilling. This video acknowledges that there are legitimate concerns over the fracking industry, but makes the case that oil shale companies are trying to educate the public, and remedy the concerns that may exist.

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What is Fracking? An Animated Intro

Posted in Fracking Jobs

Yes, fracking is controversial. Yes, there are many who oppose the practice. But, are those in the anti-fracking camp as well-informed as they pretend to be? Well, here is a straighforward video animation on what the hydraulic fracturing process of oil and gas recovery – “fracking” – is, and how it is carried out. Without the environmentalist hysteria. For an unbiased and clear-eyed view on what is fracking (and what it isn’t), watch...

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